Feedback and Reflection

The final stage of this assessment was to provide written feedback for two of our peers. Below are the two feedback rubrics I received on my blog.

(Can, n.d.)

(Can, n.d.)

 

Peer Marking 1: Blog

Name of Blog: Teaching in a Digital World

Name of marker: Amy Mcleay

 

Evidence of minimal/incomplete awareness and engagement

Grade: F

Some evidence of awareness, understanding and engagement with concepts, skills, and dispositions

Grade: P

Sound evidence of awareness, understanding and engagement with concepts, skills, and dispositions

Grade: C

Consistent, comprehensive and wide-ranging evidence of awareness, understanding and engagement with concepts, skills, and dispositions

Grade: D

Exemplary awareness, understanding and engagement with concepts, skills, and dispositions, which is generally well above expectations

Grade: HD

 

Content
Content and ideas:

Blog entries; teaching episode; written response to peer feedback; creativity and design

Provides an unclear and incoherent response to the tasks. Some content may be missing.

 

Response to the tasks is generally clear, although it may lack focus in some.

 

Provides a mostly clear and thoughtful response to the question, although it may lack focus in some tasks.

 

Provides a clear, thoughtful and mostly focused response to the tasks.

 

Provides a coherent, focused and thoughtful response to all tasks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22/30

Presentation
Organisation and coherence Lacks overall organisation, thematic unity and coherence in and/or between sentences. May lack overall organisation, but develops ideas coherently. Sentences may be limited in type or inappropriately connected. An overall logic and coherence, and a range of sentence types which are usually appropriately connected. Logically organised, ideas coherent and a range of appropriately connected sentence types. Logically organised, unity of theme and ideas coherent through a range of appropriately connected sentence types.  

 

 

 

 

6.5/10

Grammar and accuracy (including spelling and punctuation) Many grammatical errors and/or use of a limited vocabulary, which may include inappropriate usage. Numerous spelling and/or punctuation errors. Some grammatical errors and/or use of a limited vocabulary which may include inappropriate usage. Several spelling and/or punctuation errors. Some grammatical errors in complex forms, and/or may include a more limited vocabulary range. A number of spelling and/or punctuation errors. A range of contextually appropriate vocabulary and few, if any, grammatical errors. Very few spelling or punctuation errors. A wide range of contextually appropriate vocabulary and no grammatical errors. No spelling or punctuation errors.  

 

 

 

 

 

8/10

Comments:

 

Thank-you for sharing your Blog. I found your content showed a comprehensive understanding of all content. Visually your blog is creative, engaging and well organised.

I particularly liked your layout for the Pinterest site in week 5. It was easy to read and informative.

 

I have three suggestions for improvement.

*Review your blog for any redundant words used in sentences. For example in your ‘Lesson Plan’ blog there is a sentence “..IPads offer endless other opportunities..” try removing ‘other’ for a more concise academic sentence.

*When finishing a paragraph avoid using another’s ideas to conclude. For example in the Digital Divide blog your last sentence “…interact and report on what’s happening in their society (Ushahidi, 2008). Experiment with adding a concluding thought in your own words.

*Lastly my research on reflective writing provided me with a format of three distinct sections. A Description (What happened etc.) A Interpretation (What was the most important/interesting thing learn/discovered and Outcome (What was learnt? What does it mean for my future?). I would suggest that you look at the outcome/conclusion in each blog. In your Scratch week you conclude nicely by writing “Moving forward the challenge…”

I cannot fault any other areas with ease, your spelling and writing style are enjoyable and your visual additives are appropriate. If you would like my PDF on Reflective writing let me know but I am sure you have your own resources.

Total:       36.5 /50

 

Peer Marking 2: Blog 

Name of Blog: Jasmine Housden

Teaching in a Digital World

Name of marker:­­­­­­­­ Tarryn Scott

 

Evidence of minimal/incomplete awareness and engagement

Grade: F

Some evidence of awareness, understanding and engagement with concepts, skills, and dispositions

Grade: P

Sound evidence of awareness, understanding and engagement with concepts, skills, and dispositions

Grade: C

Consistent, comprehensive and wide-ranging evidence of awareness, understanding and engagement with concepts, skills, and dispositions

Grade: D

Exemplary awareness, understanding and engagement with concepts, skills, and dispositions, which is generally well above expectations

Grade: HD

 

Content
Content and ideas:

Blog entries; teaching episode; written response to peer feedback; creativity and design

Provides an unclear and incoherent response to the tasks. Some content may be missing.

 

Response to the tasks is generally clear, although it may lack focus in some.

 

Provides a mostly clear and thoughtful response to the question, although it may lack focus in some tasks.

 

Provides a clear, thoughtful and mostly focused response to the tasks.

 

Provides a coherent, focused and thoughtful response to all tasks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

25   /30

Presentation
Organisation and coherence Lacks overall organisation, thematic unity and coherence in and/or between sentences. May lack overall organisation, but develops ideas coherently. Sentences may be limited in type or inappropriately connected. An overall logic and coherence, and a range of sentence types which are usually appropriately connected. Logically organised, ideas coherent and a range of appropriately connected sentence types. Logically organised, unity of theme and ideas coherent through a range of appropriately connected sentence types.  

 

 

 

 

8/10

Grammar and accuracy (including spelling and punctuation) Many grammatical errors and/or use of a limited vocabulary, which may include inappropriate usage. Numerous spelling and/or punctuation errors. Some grammatical errors and/or use of a limited vocabulary which may include inappropriate usage. Several spelling and/or punctuation errors. Some grammatical errors in complex forms, and/or may include a more limited vocabulary range. A number of spelling and/or punctuation errors. A range of contextually appropriate vocabulary and few, if any, grammatical errors. Very few spelling or punctuation errors. A wide range of contextually appropriate vocabulary and no grammatical errors. No spelling or punctuation errors.  

 

 

 

 

 

7/10

Comments:

Jasmine your blog is very comprehensive and well referenced. You have used a wide range of resources to support your blog. The pages appeared very busy at times with my eyes wandering to the images whilst trying to read the text in some instances. Other than that great job

Total:     40/50

 

(Kakisy, n.d.)

(Kakisy, n.d.)

The feedback I received from Amy and Tarryn was both positive and constructive. The consensus from both peers outlined my photos inhibited some of my blogs. I agreed with this feedback, and spent considerable time editing my blogs to present my pictures, text and additional media in a more aesthetically pleasing manner.  I am pleased with the result.

Amy spent considerable time reviewing my blog, and suggested when I am editing I should remove redundant words to create concise academic sentences. Furthermore, she highlighted that I had concluded one Blog with a paraphrase instead of using my own words, and provided a format for creating reflective blogs. I appreciate the additional time Amy spent reviewing my blog. This feedback scaffolded my editing, and enabled me to see my blog through the eyes of another reader and pick up on undetected grammatical errors. The experience was invaluable and I have made considerable changes to my blog that accommodate the feedback suggestions.

 

References

 
Can, A. J. (n.d.). Peer review. [Cartoon]. Retrieved from

http://www.flickr.com/photos/ajc1/6735929719/in/faves-95123867@N07/

 

Kakisky. (n.d.). Peer review. Retrieved from

 

Lesson Plan

(Doherty, 2007)

(Doherty, 2007)

The next addition to my Blog, is my lesson plan. My aim throughout this lesson is to enhance the lesson objectives by integrating digital technologies. Interactive whiteboards and IPads have been incorporated to engage the students. The interactive whiteboard supports teacher led demonstrations and the students use it as a manipulative. Willers (n.d.) argue the educational benefits of an interactive whiteboard are endless, moreover, it is an invaluable tool for 21st century instruction. The IPad is themain digital resource assimilated into the body of the lesson. The IPad offers endless authentic and virtual learning experiences. Integrating IPads into classrooms aims to minimise the digital divide,  from children who have internet access at home and those who do not (Howell, 2013). 

(Wainwright, n.d.)

(Wainwright, n.d.)

The application Geobard (https://itunes.apple.com/au/app/geoboard-by-math-learning/id519896952?mt=8)  is the focal point of the lesson. IPads offer learning opportunities such as making videos, internet research, class blogs, art classes, making music and promote Global citizenship by enabling students to communicate with students on the other side of the world (Pearson, 2010). I feel the digital technologies in this lesson enhance the learning experience and cradle the learning objectives.   

 

Teaching Episode – Template

 

Year: 4 Mathematics

 

Lesson objective: Identify similar shapes via digital and non-digital technologies. Apply and compare areas of shapes by examining measurements.

 

1 Hour lesson

 

General Capabilities-:

–       Information and Communication Technologies

–       Personal and social capabilities

–       Critical and creative thinking

Resources:

–          Interactive whiteboard with Topmarks Maths activity downloaded

–          IPads with Geoboard uploaded on each device

–          You Tube video downloaded on whiteboard on Geoboard. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=55qKjUx5EPQ

–          Handout with blank graph for students to display their results

 

Topic:

Australian Curriculum Content Descriptors

Create symmetrical patterns, pictures and shapes with and without digital technologies (ACMMG091)

Learn to measure

Use scaled instruments to measure and compare lengths, masses, capacities and temperatures (ACMMG084)

Prior Knowledge-

  • Familiar with a variety of shapes, interactive whiteboard lesson introducing them to new shapes, students then had an opportunity to use straws as manipulatives to recreate the shapes they had just learnt.

 

Introduction- 15 Mins

  • Students sit on central carpet for collaborative discussion. Revise shape concepts and introduce measurement concepts such as how to measure the lengths of each side of a shape- using interactive whiteboard activity by Topmarks (2014) collaborative student led activity the teacher can scaffold and guide higher learning by asking higher order questions.

 

Main Body of lesson- 30 Mins

  • Show a brief Youtube video on how to use the application Geoboard on the Ipad.
  • Teacher led demonstration using the IPad application Geoboard
  • Split students into pairs, one Ipad per student pair
  • Write a list of shapes on the board for students to create/measure
  • Results to be listed on handout provided

 

Conclusion- 15 Mins

  •  Sitting back on central carpet reflect on lesson objectives. Asking the following questions to initiate collaborative student led discussion-: Did the Ipad application assist them to understand the nature of shapes? Why? Do they prefer to measure on the Ipad of manually? Why? Which shape is the easiest to measure? Why? Do they know of any other IPad games or applications that they have used in the past that relate to measurement? Do they have any suggestions of alternative ways we could practice our measurement skills?

 

 

Follow up lesson options

  • Moving into more complex shapes with Geoboard, putting two shapes together and calculating measurements.
 

 

Assessment-

  • Formative assessment through observation whilst working in pairs, and from collecting the handouts.
  • Take anecdotal notes of student’s individual competence with measurement to address who may need additional support.

 

 

References

 

Doherty, P. (2007). Schools to install digital whiteboards. Retrieved from

http://www.theage.com.au/news/technology/schools-to-install-digital-whiteboards/2007/06/18/1182019011079.html

 

Howell, J. (2012). Teaching with ICT. Oxford University Press; South Melbourne, VIC.

 

Pearson. (2010). IPads in the classroom. Retrieved from

http://www.bbcactive.com/BBCActiveIdeasandResources/iPadsintheClassroom.aspx

 

Wainwright, A. (2012). 7 policy tips for deploying Ipads in the classroom. Retrieved from

http://www.securedgenetworks.com/secure-edge-networks-blog/bid/82548/7-Policy-Tips-for-deploying-iPads-in-the-classroom

 

Willers, K. (n.d.). Out smarting the interactive whiteboard. Retrieved from

http://themadeleine.com/prin/ipad-wboard.pdf

Week 8- LIFE-LONG LEARNING.

(Maryland Public Television, 2014)

(Maryland Public Television, 2014)

(WordPress, 2014)

(WordPress, 2014)

Lifelong learning was the focus of this week’s readings. I believe teachers who scaffold lifelong learning prepare students for the real world by promoting a life of endless learning. To adequately prepare by students for participation in a global digital economy, I feel digital competence is a crucial lifelong learning skill. European Parliament (2006) state digital competence involves the confident and critical use of information communication technologies (ICT) for employment, learning, self-development and participation in society. Additionally, Howell (2014) suggests digital competencies scaffold students to explicitly transition into a global information society. 

 

(Penniless Teacher, 2013)

(Penniless Teacher, 2013)

Having analysed the benefits concerning lifelong learning skills, specifically digital competencies, I recognize the ability to navigate online will propel a smooth transition into the real world.  Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs (2008) support digital lifelong learning, suggesting rapid information advances are changing the way we share, develop and process information. The Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting authority (ACARA) support this declaration through integrating digital technologies into content descriptors cross-curricula (ACARA, 2012). The six week reflective blog journey across the digital world has significantly developed my appreciation for digital technologies’. I now recognise how crucial digital technologies are to an aspiring teacher, who is living and working in the digital world.

 

 

Below I have presented life-long learning via a Prezi presentation, another Digital Technology I have embraced on my learning journey………………….

 

http://prezi.com/jx1ucngmmuju/present/?auth_key=aefugep&follow=zbvgmm3ngk7s

 

References

ACARA: Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority.  (2010). The shape

of the Australian Curriculum. Retrieved from http://www.acara.edu.au/verve/_resources/Shape_of_the_Australian_Curriculum.pdf

 

European Parliament. (2006). Key competencies for lifelong learning. Retrieved from

http://enil.ceris.cnr.it/Basili/EnIL/gateway/europe/EUkeycompetences.htm

 

Fotolia. (n.d.) Lifelong learning. Retrieved from

http://www.fotolia.com/id/32825018

 

Howell, J. (2014). Living and learning in a digital world: mod 02 04 week 8  [ilecture].

Retrieved from http://echo.ilecture.curtin.edu.au:8080/ess/echo/presentation/b2505e94-8731-4027-a469-e157191e565b

 

Howell, J. (2012). Teaching with ICT. Oxford University Press; South Melbourne, VIC.

 

Kutztown University. (2012). Teacher as a lifelong learning.

Retrieved from http://www2.kutztown.edu/academics/colleges-and-departments/education/teacher-as-a-lifelong-learner.htm

  

Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs (MCEETYA).

(2008) Melbourne declaration on educational goals for young Australians. Retrieved , from http://www.mceecdya.edu.au/verve/_resources/national_declaration_on_the_educational_goals_for_young_australians.pdf

 

Otten, H. & Ohana, Y. (2009). The eight key competencies for lifelong learning; An

appropriate framework within which to develop the competence of trainers in the field of European youth work or just plain politics? Retrieved from https://www.salto-youth.net/downloads/4-17-1881/Trainer_%20Competence_study_final.pdf

 

Penniless Teacher. (2013). Pendaflex newer stop learning. Retrieved from

http://pennilessteacher.com/2013/07/pendaflex-never-stop-learning-x-72613.html

  

Raby, P. (2013). Reflections on digital citizenship. Retrieved from

http://philrabysbrockblog.wordpress.com/2013/01/

  

Tidewater Community College. (n.d.). Lifelong learning. Retrieved from

https://www.tcc.edu/students/military/Military%20Contract%20Programs/LifelongLearning.htm

 

Tracy, B. (n.d.). Commit yourself to lifelong learning. Retrieved from  

http://www.glogster.com/loryrous/commit-yourself-to-lifelong-learning-/g-6l5o4vpbt7t84ihmdv1r0a0

 

TT Group. (n.d.). The importance of lifelong learning. Retrieved from

http://www.tt-group.net/education/High_Education_Reforms/High_Education_Reforms_in_Serbia_01.htm

 

WordPress. (2014). Never stop learning. Retrieved from

http://www.artfulbusinessconference.com/never-stop-learning/

 

Youth Pass. (n.d.). Learning to learn. Retrieved from

https://www.youthpass.eu/lv/youthpass/documentation/action-2/key-competence-learning-to-learn/

 

Week 7- DIGITAL BLURRING

(Switch Automation, 2014)

(Switch Automation, 2014)

(Crazy 4 monograms, n.d.)

(Crazy 4 monograms, n.d.)

Digital blurring was the focus for this week. The most meaningful learning arose from exploring the skills we can transfer from our personal digital worlds, into the real world. This knowledge is critical to me as a future teacher, as students spend hours engrossed in digital technologies. Half of all babies in the United States have used a computer or smartphone before age two (Media Literacy Learning House, n.d.). This exposure illuminates how young children transition into digital natives. Howell (2014) highlights a few transferable digital technology platforms through gaming, that promote the idea of digital blurring. Howell (2014) attests platforms, although controversial, include hand and eye coordination and accelerated development of fine motor skills.

(Nelson Education, 2012)

(Nelson Education, 2012)

This week challenged me to produce a video game. Surprisingly, unlike previous digital technologies I found Splodder to be quite user friendly. I discovered learning is more prevalent when games are designed to address a specific problem or to teach a certain skill. Griffiths (2002) studies have concluded age appropriate gaming can produce a reduction in reaction times, improved hand eye coordination and raise player self-esteem. McGonigal (2013) attributes increased self-esteem to epic winning, attesting self-esteem is boosted through obtainable challenges available in games. As a next step, I need to research age appropriate games that can in integrated into the classroom to enhance learning objectives.

Below is a Slideshare by McGonigal addressing 10 practical ways a teacher can integrate gaming into the classroom

 

References

 
Crazy for Monograms. (2014). Using Wii in the Maths classroom.

Retrieved from http://suntansandlessonplans.blogspot.com.au/2013/11/using-wii-in-math-classroom.html

 

Griffiths, M. (2002). The educational benefits of video games. Education and Health. 20

(3). Retrieved from http://dh101.humanities.ucla.edu/DH101Fall12Lab4/archive/files/6070f0882cc89baa5a12992aaea56028.pdf

 

Howell, J. (2014). Living and learning in a digital world: mod 02 04 week 7 [ilecture].

Retrieved from http://echo.ilecture.curtin.edu.au:8080/ess/echo/presentation/9d8a1cd3-f679-4184-8791-6765f6454274

 

McGonigal, J. (2010). Gaming can make a better world. Retrieved from

http://www.ted.com/talks/jane_mcgonigal_gaming_can_make_a_better_world#t-1032381

 

Nelson Education. (2014). Are you game-ifying your class. Retrieved from

http://weinspirefutures.com/front-page/are-you-game-ifying-your-class-infographic/

 

Media Literacy Learing House. (n.d.). New study tracks Americans news habits. Retrieved

from http://www.frankwbaker.com/mediause.htm

 

Switch Automation. (2014). Trend talk + pitch off: The digital-physical blur. Retrieved

from http://gamifier.com/gamification-blog-posts/gaming-in-the-classroom/

 

 

Week 6: DIGITAL FLUENCY.

(Corwith & Heine, 2012)

(Corwith & Heine, 2012)

I firmly believe that teachers should seamlessly integrate technology tools, such as IPads, to scaffold student’s digital fluency.  Digital fluency empowers individuals to create an aptitude for success in the digitally connected world, through effectively interpreting data, discovering meaning and digitally communicating ideas (Boise State University, 2014). Scratch is a succinct example of digitally communicating ideas that teachers can embed into classroom activities. For example, for Christmas themed activities students can create a Scratch Advent calendar.

(US Department of Education, 2010)
(US Department of Education, 2010)

 

Initially, I struggled with the challenge of learning animations, not considering how involved a product like Scratch might be. Similar to my previous challenging experiences, such as week four creating a Pinterest page, I discovered the more time I invested the more competent I became.

 

(Tolisano, n.d.)

(Tolisano, n.d.)

These poignant experiences relate directly to the theories discussed in week one. Reiterating that success in the modern classroom implies teachers must digitally evolve through changing and adapting their digital pedagogy’s (Howell, 2012). Moving forward, the challenge for modern teachers is to integrate a number of succinct quantifiable technology variables, that can scaffold a digitally fluent classroom.

 

Please find below my first Scratch Animation game! Please jump in and have a go, see if you can make it to the school doors! 

My first ever animation. Will the girls make it to school on time?? Please click on this link to play my interactive game-: http://scratch.mit.edu/projects/21616758/

My first ever animation. Will the girls make it to school on time?? Please click on this link to play my interactive game-: http://scratch.mit.edu/projects/21616758/

 

References

 
Boise State University. (2014). Definition of digital fluency. Retrieved from

http://at.boisestate.edu/home/definition-of-digital-fluency/

 
 
Corwith, S. & Heine, C. (2012). Gifted kids may be tech savvy, but are they fluent?

Retrieved from http://ctdblog.northwestern.edu/2012/04/10/gifted-kids-may-be-tech-savvy-but-are-they-fluent/

 
 
Howell, J. (2012). Teaching with ICT. Oxford University Press; South Melbourne, VIC.

 
 
Tolisano, S. R. (n.d.). Digital fluency. Retrieved from

https://langwitches.wikispaces.com/Digital+Fluency

 
 
U.S. Department of Education. (2010).n.d.) National Education Technology Plan 2010

Executive Summary.

Retrieved from http://www.ed.gov/technology/netp-2010

 
 
White, G. (2013). Digital fluency for the digital age. Retrieved from

http://rd.acer.edu.au/article/digital-fluency-for-the-digital-age

 

YouTube video on how to make a Scratch Animation

 

A amusing little YouTube Video on the importance of integrating digital technologies into the classroom.

WEEK 5: A TEACHERS INTEREST IN PINTEREST.

 

(Sanchez, 2014)

(Sanchez, 2014)


The living and working in a digital world journey continued this week, introducing engaging ways of digitally presenting information. I explored Pinterest and discovered a fresh outlook on accessing and presenting information. Initially, I did not realize the scope of options that Pinterest offered. Having experienced the website first hand, I can envision actively using this website in the classroom for classroom activities and lesson planning. For example, aggregating ideas and sources for a classroom project on recycling. BBC Active (2010) suggests that students use Pinterest for collaborative work, independent work and grouping resources. Furthermore, BBC Active highlight that teachers can utilize the “Pinning boards” to collaborate with other teachers by sharing resources, videos, images and infographics.

Pinterest creates a social network environment of endless possibilities. For example, students and teachers can share and comment on each other’s work, stay on top of educational news and trends, and find new ways to decorate the classroom (Wells, 2012). To create an engaging learning environment, websites such as Pinterest will be essential to me as a future teacher. To extend a dynamic, tech powered learning environment, teachers need to shift from owning information and learning, towards facilitating information and learning (Barseghian, 2011). Pinterest is an example of teachers putting their collective smarts together to engage 21st century students.

 

References

 

Barseghian, T. (2011). Three trends that define the future of teaching and learning. Retrieved from   http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2011/02/three-trends-that-define-the-future-of-teaching-and-learning/

 

BBC Active. (2010). Using Pinterest for education. Retrieved from http://www.bbcactive.com/BBCActiveIdeasandResources/UsingPinterestforEducation.aspx

 

Sanchez, C. (2014). Is Pinterest a teachers new best friend in the classroom? Retrieved from http://www.ohsopinteresting.com/is-pinterest-a-teachers-new-best-friend-in-the-classroom/

 

Wells, S. (2012). How teachers and educators can use Pinterest as a resource in and out of the classroom. Retrieved from http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/blog/education-today/how-teachers-and-educators-can-use-pinterest-as-a-resource-in-and-out-of-the-classroom/

 

Aspiring Teacher? Would like to know how to captivate your students with Pinterest? Please watch the below Youtube videos!

 

Here are two Pinterest pages I created. The first I created for a possible anti-cyberbullying campaign for a school, the other identifies the features for living in a digital world.

 

 

An succinct example of using Pinterest in the classroom. This link would be useful to teachers seeking new ideas for art lessons.

http://www.pinterest.com/explore/primary-school-art/?p=7

 

For my own personal use, my daughter is 18 months, I searched for help to develop her fine motor skills and discovered this useful page with endless links with ideas for toddlers-:

http://www.pinterest.com/source/learnwithplayathome.com/

Week 4: THE GREAT DIGITAL DIVIDE.

 

(Build African Schools, 2011)

(Build African Schools, 2011)

This blog focuses on the stark reality of the digital divide. My infographic highlights the digital divide between Kenya and Australia. For me, the most significant issue was Kenya’s lack of internet. How can students in Kenya break the cycle of poverty if they are not given the same opportunities as students in developed countries?

(The Economist, 2012)

(The Economist, 2012)

I discovered that mobile technology has emerged as a powerful tool, and can play a crucial role in giving the excluded a voice. Interestingly 93%of Kenyans use mobile phones (World Bank, 2013). Mobile phones yield alternative learning options, such as live news feeds, catering to those who cannot read or write. Furthermore, Randovanovic (2013) argues slow internet and electricity shortages do not affect mobiles. Like Kenya, Australian rural areas have started to take advantage of Mobile technologies.

 

(NT Mojos, 2011)

(NT Mojos, 2011)

I unearthed that both rural Australia and Kenya have implemented programs to promote mobiletechnologies. NT Mojo launched in 2011 enables indigenous people to film, edit and share stories on mobiles (Northern Territory Mobile Journalists, 2011). Similarly, Kenya implemented Ushahidi to help give Kenyans a voice by developing free software that enables users to share, interact and report on what’s happening in society (Ushahidi, 2008). Moving forward, I acknowledge the economic and social inequality the digital divide presents. To promote change, teachers must support government projects, recognize inequalities and offer equal opportunities.

  

(My Technology Wordle)

(My Technology Wordle)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below is my info graphic that addresses the digital divide between Kenya and Australia.

Digtal tech infographic Copy

 

 

References

 

Build African Schools. (2011). Kenyas laptops for schools dream fails to address reality.

Retrieved from  http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/poverty-matters/2013/jun/27/kenya-laptops-schools

 
 
Northern Territory Mobile Journalists. (2011) The NT Mojos story.

Retrieved from http://ntmojos.indigenous.gov.au/about/the-nt-mojos-story/

 
 
Porritt, A. (2013). Bringing your own technology to school. Retrieved from

http://www.abc.net.au/technology/articles/2013/06/25/3789210.htm

 
 
Randovanovic, D. (2013). Social media and mobile technologies in bridging digital

divides. Retrieved from http://dejanseo.com.au/social-media-and-mobile-technologies/

 
The Economist. (2012). Upwardly mobile.

Retrieved from http://www.economist.com/node/21560912

 
 
The World Bank. (2012). Kenya’s mobile revolution and the promise of mobile savings.

Retrieved
from http://elibrary.worldbank.org/doi/book/10.1596/1813-9450- 5988

 
 
Ushahidi. (2008). About us. Retrieved from http://ushahidi.com/about-us/

WEEK 3: HOW PREVALENT IS THE ISSUE OF CYBERBULLYING IN AUSTRALIAN SCHOOLS, AND HOW CAN TEACHERS IDENTIFY IF A STUDENT IS BEING CYBERBULLIED?

(Netsafe, n.d.)

(Netsafe, n.d.)

It is succinct to say that bullying is prevalent in most schools, with cyberbullying the latest prototype emerging from the modern digital world. The Queensland Government (2014) concluded that 27% of primary students were cyber bullied every few weeks during 2013. Furthermore, Queensland Government’s (2014) research concluded one quarter of cyberbullying targeted people they did not know. These studies heighten the necessity for schools to take action and integrate cyber safety programs that educate students about their digital footprint. To counteract cyberbullying a teacher needs to regularly update their digital technologies knowledge, and observe student behaviours for abnormalities.

 

Cyberbullying is evident across all digital technologies, such as mobile phones, computers and tablets.

(Avatar Generation, 2013)

(Avatar Generation, 2013)

Monitoring student behaviour is vital, if a teacher observes abnormal behaviour they should investigate for possible cyberbullying. Common side effects include depression, anxiety and decreased academic achievement (Commonwealth of Australia, 2014). I have significantly developed my understanding of cyberbullying. This knowledge is essential to me as a future teacher to ensure the safety of my students. If cyberbullying is prevalent the teacher should implement programs that create an awareness of security issues, inform students of negative consequences resulting in inappropriate digital identities, and empower the students to take ownership and responsibilities of their digital footprint.

 

 

 

Here is a fabulous Youtube video for future teachers suggesting: Stand up, Don’t stand by! Also comforting teachers by addressing the wide range of resources available.

 

References

 

Avatar Generation. (2013). Free cyberbullying safety poster. Retrieved from

http://www.avatargeneration.com/2012/11/free-cyber-bullying-safety-poster/

 

Commonwealth of Australia. (2014). What does cyberbullying look like? Retrieved

from
http://www.cybersmart.gov.au/teens/how%20do%20I%20deal% 20with/cyberbullying.aspx

 

Netsafe. (n.d.). Cyberbullying: advice for young people, parents and teachers. Retrieved

from
http://www.netsafe.org.nz/cyberbullying-advice-for-young-people- parents-and-teachers/

 

Queensland Government. (2014). Bullying and cyberbullying facts. Retrieved from

http://www.qld.gov.au/disability/children-young-people/bullying/facts.html

 

PLEASE TAKE THE TIME TO COMPLETE MY BRIEF SURVEY ON CYBERBULLYING.