WEEK 5: A TEACHERS INTEREST IN PINTEREST.

 

(Sanchez, 2014)

(Sanchez, 2014)


The living and working in a digital world journey continued this week, introducing engaging ways of digitally presenting information. I explored Pinterest and discovered a fresh outlook on accessing and presenting information. Initially, I did not realize the scope of options that Pinterest offered. Having experienced the website first hand, I can envision actively using this website in the classroom for classroom activities and lesson planning. For example, aggregating ideas and sources for a classroom project on recycling. BBC Active (2010) suggests that students use Pinterest for collaborative work, independent work and grouping resources. Furthermore, BBC Active highlight that teachers can utilize the “Pinning boards” to collaborate with other teachers by sharing resources, videos, images and infographics.

Pinterest creates a social network environment of endless possibilities. For example, students and teachers can share and comment on each other’s work, stay on top of educational news and trends, and find new ways to decorate the classroom (Wells, 2012). To create an engaging learning environment, websites such as Pinterest will be essential to me as a future teacher. To extend a dynamic, tech powered learning environment, teachers need to shift from owning information and learning, towards facilitating information and learning (Barseghian, 2011). Pinterest is an example of teachers putting their collective smarts together to engage 21st century students.

 

References

 

Barseghian, T. (2011). Three trends that define the future of teaching and learning. Retrieved from   http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2011/02/three-trends-that-define-the-future-of-teaching-and-learning/

 

BBC Active. (2010). Using Pinterest for education. Retrieved from http://www.bbcactive.com/BBCActiveIdeasandResources/UsingPinterestforEducation.aspx

 

Sanchez, C. (2014). Is Pinterest a teachers new best friend in the classroom? Retrieved from http://www.ohsopinteresting.com/is-pinterest-a-teachers-new-best-friend-in-the-classroom/

 

Wells, S. (2012). How teachers and educators can use Pinterest as a resource in and out of the classroom. Retrieved from http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/blog/education-today/how-teachers-and-educators-can-use-pinterest-as-a-resource-in-and-out-of-the-classroom/

 

Aspiring Teacher? Would like to know how to captivate your students with Pinterest? Please watch the below Youtube videos!

 

Here are two Pinterest pages I created. The first I created for a possible anti-cyberbullying campaign for a school, the other identifies the features for living in a digital world.

 

 

An succinct example of using Pinterest in the classroom. This link would be useful to teachers seeking new ideas for art lessons.

http://www.pinterest.com/explore/primary-school-art/?p=7

 

For my own personal use, my daughter is 18 months, I searched for help to develop her fine motor skills and discovered this useful page with endless links with ideas for toddlers-:

http://www.pinterest.com/source/learnwithplayathome.com/

Week 4: THE GREAT DIGITAL DIVIDE.

 

(Build African Schools, 2011)

(Build African Schools, 2011)

This blog focuses on the stark reality of the digital divide. My infographic highlights the digital divide between Kenya and Australia. For me, the most significant issue was Kenya’s lack of internet. How can students in Kenya break the cycle of poverty if they are not given the same opportunities as students in developed countries?

(The Economist, 2012)

(The Economist, 2012)

I discovered that mobile technology has emerged as a powerful tool, and can play a crucial role in giving the excluded a voice. Interestingly 93%of Kenyans use mobile phones (World Bank, 2013). Mobile phones yield alternative learning options, such as live news feeds, catering to those who cannot read or write. Furthermore, Randovanovic (2013) argues slow internet and electricity shortages do not affect mobiles. Like Kenya, Australian rural areas have started to take advantage of Mobile technologies.

 

(NT Mojos, 2011)

(NT Mojos, 2011)

I unearthed that both rural Australia and Kenya have implemented programs to promote mobiletechnologies. NT Mojo launched in 2011 enables indigenous people to film, edit and share stories on mobiles (Northern Territory Mobile Journalists, 2011). Similarly, Kenya implemented Ushahidi to help give Kenyans a voice by developing free software that enables users to share, interact and report on what’s happening in society (Ushahidi, 2008). Moving forward, I acknowledge the economic and social inequality the digital divide presents. To promote change, teachers must support government projects, recognize inequalities and offer equal opportunities.

  

(My Technology Wordle)

(My Technology Wordle)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Below is my info graphic that addresses the digital divide between Kenya and Australia.

Digtal tech infographic Copy

 

 

References

 

Build African Schools. (2011). Kenyas laptops for schools dream fails to address reality.

Retrieved from  http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/poverty-matters/2013/jun/27/kenya-laptops-schools

 
 
Northern Territory Mobile Journalists. (2011) The NT Mojos story.

Retrieved from http://ntmojos.indigenous.gov.au/about/the-nt-mojos-story/

 
 
Porritt, A. (2013). Bringing your own technology to school. Retrieved from

http://www.abc.net.au/technology/articles/2013/06/25/3789210.htm

 
 
Randovanovic, D. (2013). Social media and mobile technologies in bridging digital

divides. Retrieved from http://dejanseo.com.au/social-media-and-mobile-technologies/

 
The Economist. (2012). Upwardly mobile.

Retrieved from http://www.economist.com/node/21560912

 
 
The World Bank. (2012). Kenya’s mobile revolution and the promise of mobile savings.

Retrieved
from http://elibrary.worldbank.org/doi/book/10.1596/1813-9450- 5988

 
 
Ushahidi. (2008). About us. Retrieved from http://ushahidi.com/about-us/

WEEK 3: HOW PREVALENT IS THE ISSUE OF CYBERBULLYING IN AUSTRALIAN SCHOOLS, AND HOW CAN TEACHERS IDENTIFY IF A STUDENT IS BEING CYBERBULLIED?

(Netsafe, n.d.)

(Netsafe, n.d.)

It is succinct to say that bullying is prevalent in most schools, with cyberbullying the latest prototype emerging from the modern digital world. The Queensland Government (2014) concluded that 27% of primary students were cyber bullied every few weeks during 2013. Furthermore, Queensland Government’s (2014) research concluded one quarter of cyberbullying targeted people they did not know. These studies heighten the necessity for schools to take action and integrate cyber safety programs that educate students about their digital footprint. To counteract cyberbullying a teacher needs to regularly update their digital technologies knowledge, and observe student behaviours for abnormalities.

 

Cyberbullying is evident across all digital technologies, such as mobile phones, computers and tablets.

(Avatar Generation, 2013)

(Avatar Generation, 2013)

Monitoring student behaviour is vital, if a teacher observes abnormal behaviour they should investigate for possible cyberbullying. Common side effects include depression, anxiety and decreased academic achievement (Commonwealth of Australia, 2014). I have significantly developed my understanding of cyberbullying. This knowledge is essential to me as a future teacher to ensure the safety of my students. If cyberbullying is prevalent the teacher should implement programs that create an awareness of security issues, inform students of negative consequences resulting in inappropriate digital identities, and empower the students to take ownership and responsibilities of their digital footprint.

 

 

 

Here is a fabulous Youtube video for future teachers suggesting: Stand up, Don’t stand by! Also comforting teachers by addressing the wide range of resources available.

 

References

 

Avatar Generation. (2013). Free cyberbullying safety poster. Retrieved from

http://www.avatargeneration.com/2012/11/free-cyber-bullying-safety-poster/

 

Commonwealth of Australia. (2014). What does cyberbullying look like? Retrieved

from
http://www.cybersmart.gov.au/teens/how%20do%20I%20deal% 20with/cyberbullying.aspx

 

Netsafe. (n.d.). Cyberbullying: advice for young people, parents and teachers. Retrieved

from
http://www.netsafe.org.nz/cyberbullying-advice-for-young-people- parents-and-teachers/

 

Queensland Government. (2014). Bullying and cyberbullying facts. Retrieved from

http://www.qld.gov.au/disability/children-young-people/bullying/facts.html

 

PLEASE TAKE THE TIME TO COMPLETE MY BRIEF SURVEY ON CYBERBULLYING.